South Asia Council (SAC)

The South Asia Council (SAC) is one of four regional councils operating within the Association for Asian Studies (AAS). Created in 1970, these councils represent the interests of scholars working in their respective geographical areas.

Collectively, the four area councils and the Council of Conferences serve as the major policy body for the Association of Asian Studies, providing liaison between the Board of Directors and the members at large.

BOOK PRIZES

The South Asia Council oversees the following AAS book prizes:

STUDENT PRIZE

  • The South Asia Council administers a prize for the best paper presented by a graduate student at the AAS Annual Conference (see below).

SAC MEMBERS

  • Purnima Dhavan, University of Washington (Chair)
  • Rachel McDermott, Barnard College, Columbia University
  • Anne Murphy, University of British Columbia
  • Shah Mahmoud Hanifi, James Madison University
  • Sara Beth Shneiderman, University of British Columbia
  • Catherine Becker, University of Illinois, Chicago
  • Mona Bhan, DePauw University
  • Elora Shehabuddin, Rice University
  • Megan Adamson Sijapati, Gettysburg College

SAC COMMITTEES

AAS AFFILIATES RELATED TO SAC


SAC PRIZE FOR BEST GRADUATE STUDENT PAPER

The South Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies announces the 2019 competition for the best paper on a South Asia topic presented by a graduate student at the AAS Conference in Denver, Colorado.

The prize will recognize emerging scholarship in the field and foster intellectual exchange among junior and senior scholars. The award of $500 and a certificate will be presented at the 2020 AAS Conference in Boston, Massachusetts. The South Asia Council of the AAS will also provide a sum of up to $300 to the winner of the prize to partially cover the cost of his or her travel to the 2020 Boston, Massachusetts Conference, where the winner will be recognized at the AAS Presidential Address/Awards Ceremony.

The Council encourages graduate students who present papers at the March 2019 conference in Denver to submit their papers for consideration. Papers on any aspect and region of South Asia will be considered. Students must be currently registered in a doctoral program in order to be considered for the Prize. Submitted papers should be no longer than 3,000 words, excluding footnotes.

Please submit your 2019 conference paper, proof of current doctoral program registration, and panel abstract in PDF format by March 24, 2019 to Prof. Srimati Basu, srimati.basu@uky.edu. Papers received after March 24, 2019 will not be considered.


  • The SAC 2018 AAS Washington, D.C. Conference SAC Graduate Student Paper Prize winner was Maria-Magdalena Fuchs, Princeton University, for “‘Act in the Living Present’: The Anjuman-i Himayat-i Islam Lahore and the Quest for a Modern(ist) Islam”
  • The SAC 2017 AAS Toronto Conference SAC Graduate Student Paper Prize winner was Nicholas Roth, Harvard University for “To Not Be Ignorant Like Frogs in a Well: Bābū Pyāre La‘l (1870/71-1917) and Vernacular Technical Literature in Provincial North India”
  • The SAC 2016 AAS Seattle Conference SAC Graduate Student Paper Prize winner was Emma Stein (Yale University) for “Building Kanchi in the Temple-Boom Age (ca. 8th-13th Centuries)”
  • The SAC 2015 AAS Chicago Conference SAC Graduate Student Paper Prize winner was Christina Welsch (Princeton University) for "'An Indulgence which can never be denied them’: The Question of Family Benefits in the East India Company’s Madras Army, 1746-1812."
  • The SAC 2014 AAS Philadelphia Conference SAC Graduate Student Paper Prize winner was Raphael Susewind (Bielefeld University) for "The 'Wazirganj Terror Attack': Local Democracy, Land Development, and Religious Revivalism."
  • The SAC 2013 AAS San Diego Conference SAC Graduate Student Paper Prize winner was David Boyk (UC-Berkeley) for "Mofussil Urbanity: Provinciality and the Public Sphere in Patna, 1900-1906."
  • The SAC 2012 AAS Toronto Conference Graduate Student paper Prize winner was Arthur Dudney, doctoral student at Columbia University, who presented a paper entitled, "Fashioning Everyday Speech into Literary Language in Eighteenth-Century Delhi"
  • The SAC 2011 AAS Hawaii Conference Graduate Student paper Prize winner was Adrienne Fast, doctoral student at the University of British Columbia, who presented a paper entitled, "Performing "Artist": Middle-Class Identity and the Working Artist in Late-Colonial Bengal"
  • The SAC 2010 AAS Philadelphia Conference Graduate Student Paper Prize winner was Juned Shaikh, doctoral student in the History Program at the University of Washington (now at Yale University), who presented a paper entitled, "Kamyunista Jahirnama [The Communist Manifesto]: Mavali, Dalit and the Making of Mumbai's Working Class"
  • The SAC 2009 AAS Chicago Conference Graduate Student Paper Prize winner was Jason Cons (PhD candidate in Development Sociology, Cornell University), who presented a paper entitled, "Spatial Corruptions: Place, Rule, and Cattle Along the Indian-Bangladesh Border"

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