SPECIAL EVENTS

#AsiaNow Special Roundtable Discussions 

What the West Needs to Hear from Asia
Friday, March 23, 2018
10:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Washington Room 3, Exhibit Level

Asian studies broadly defined has its roots in colonial studies. It has since evolved to become a vehicle for all disciplines alone and in dialogue with each other as a method for both Western and non-Western scholars to understand Asia. A significant contribution has been for Asians to better understand their countries as part of the modernization process to study their own countries in universities in the West. However, while Western methods and theories continue to dominate scholarly exercise and discourse, there is as yet little evidence that the direction of learning can reverse its way. This is partly due to the Asians’ own failure to come up, for instance, with an international relations theory that explains East Asian international politics. More broadly speaking, it is also due to the difficulty in placing Asia and Asian scholars in the West’s intellectual community. This roundtable seeks to highlight some of these issues with the participation of people from academia and the think-tank community.

Roundtable Participants:
Haruko Satoh (Moderator), Osaka University; Joseph Haldane, Osaka University; Sheila Smith, Council on Foreign Relations; Peng Er Lam, National University of Singapore; David Chandler, Monash University (retired)


The Rohingya Question
Friday, March 23, 2018
12:45 PM – 2:45 PM
Marriott Ballroom, Salon 3

Since August 25, 2017, more than half a million Rohingya refugees have fled Myanmar to Bangladesh to escape actions various international leaders and bodies are describing as a state-sanctioned “ethnic cleansing” drive and has been called by some a “genocide” in the making. This special AAS panel will bring together a group of experts with backgrounds in the fields of history, anthropology, law, and journalism to critically discuss the genesis and construction of Rohingya ethnic claims, and to examine whether the Rohingya are currently subject to deliberate killings in Rakhine State and assess the general human rights situation in that part of Myanmar.

Roundtable Participants:
Maitrii V. Aung-Thwin (Moderator), National University of Singapore; Francis Wade, Freelance Journalist; Jacques Leider, École française d'Extrême-Orient; Magnus Fiskesjö, Cornell University; David Steinberg, Johns Hopkins University; Tharaphi Than, Northern Illinois University


New Kinds of Censorship Pressures
Saturday, March 24, 2018
8:30 AM – 10:30 AM
Marriott Ballroom, Salon 3

This special panel is designed to respond to a specific issue of great concern to the AAS membership, due to its implications for the Journal of Asian Studies: recent moves to limit the circulation of scholarly work on the Chinese mainland. While engaging with this subject, though, this panel will combine it with discussion of related concerns affecting other parts of Asia, such as Thailand and Cambodia. The participants will include the editors of the JAS and China Quarterly, as well as journalists and others who have been on the frontlines of censorship and free speech struggles in places other than the PRC.

Roundtable Participants:
Jeffrey Wasserstrom (Co-moderator), Journal of Asian Studies; Tim Pringle (Co-moderator), China Quarterly; Pavin Chachavalpongpun, Kyoto University; Rebecca MacKinnon, New America; Krisna Uk, Association for Asian Studies; Louisa Lim, University of Melbourne


Asian Arts and Resistance: Defiant Subjects and their Disobedient Objects
Saturday, March 24, 2018
10:45 AM – 12:45 PM
Washington Room 3, Exhibit Level

All across Asia artists, writers, musicians, dramatists, and architects have used their expressive capacities—and, increasingly, new media—to critique the status quo, political regimes, and social establishments. At the same time, states and other powerful patrons regularly use and support expressive forms to celebrate and legitimate their own authority. Scholars in numerous disciplines, time periods, and areas of Asia are currently examining these complex relationships between artistic expression and political power. This panel brings together artists from Hong Kong, Myanmar, Cambodia, and India, who through urban space installations, photographs, sculptures, and films have created unique discursive and imaginative spaces where art collapses into political discourses. This panel on the multiple and simultaneous uses of art as personal expression, political analysis, and social critique will provide a unique venue for the exploration of these relationships today.

Roundtable Participants:
Laurel Kendall (Moderator), American Museum of Natural History; Sarvnik Kaur, Filmmaker; Tushar Madhav, Filmmaker; Minzayar Oo, Photographer; Svay Sareth, Sculptor and Performance Artist; Sampson Wong, Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts; Samson Yuen, Lingnan University

These sessions are generously sponsored by 

Ford-Foundation-transparent


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