AsiaNow banner

Change of Plans: Conducting Research in Xinjiang

By Elise Anderson In April 2018, the China and Inner Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies awarded me a Small Grant to travel to Ürümchi (Urumqi, Wulumuqi), Xinjiang, China, to conduct a two-week feasibility study on the topic of “Gender and Music in Uyghur Society.” I planned to draw on my extensive connections in the region to conduct preliminary interviews and participant-observation, as well as to collect written and audio/visual resources, all with the goal of eliciting themes related to how gendered social expectations impact music-making and other forms of cultural production for members of the Uyghur minority. I envisioned this trip as marking the start of my first post-Ph.D. project. A slogan painted on a wall in a Turpan neighborhood, which reads in Uyghur: “Loving the homeland and Xinjiang; unity—making contributions; working hard; helping one another; opening up; progressing.” This and all other photos by the author, June 2018 My interest a ...

Read the rest of entry »

First China Made Workshop: Conceiving Infrastructure in a Chinese Register

By Alessandro Rippa In 2015, a mind-blowing statistic made the rounds of all major news outlets: China used more cement between 2011 and 2013 than the United States had in the entire 20th century. While astounding, the news was hardly surprising. During the previous two decades China watchers and the general public alike had become accustomed to the country’s flamboyant infrastructure projects. The Three Gorges Dam, Beijing’s Olympic stadium, the world’s longest high-speed railway network, the longest sea crossing … the list goes on. As Jonathan Bach puts it: “In our present era, China stands out as the paradigmatic infrastructural state: a state produced by and through infrastructure as a modern project.” At the same time, in academia, recent years have seen a proliferation of social science studies of infrastructure. “Infrastructure” became a recurrent theme of debates at disciplinary conferences and workshops, leading to some scholars wondering whe ...

Read the rest of entry »

AAS 2018 Election Results

The fall 2018 AAS elections have concluded, and we are pleased to provide the results in each category. Although the national mid-term elections no doubt occupied most members’ attentions, the fall AAS election also has concluded, and we are happy to provide the results in each category. A total of 1,959 votes were cast, representing about 29% of the membership, slightly down from last year’s record 32% participation. Newly elected representatives will take office immediately after the upcoming annual conference in Denver next March.  We congratulate the winners and thank all candidates for their willingness to serve the association. We also thank all members who participated in the electoral process, both national and organizational, especially in a political climate that is so polarized and dysfunctional. President Current Vice President Prasenjit Duara (Duke University) will move into the presidency. Vice President Christine Yano (University of ...

Read the rest of entry »

November 2018 AAS Member News & Notes

Congratulations to the two AAS Members recognized by the American Historical Association with book prizes for their work. Tom Mullaney (Stanford University) has received the John K. Fairbank Prize for East Asian history since 1800 for The Chinese Typewriter: A History (MIT Press). Faiz Ahmed (Brown University) has been awarded the John F. Richards Prize for South Asian history for his Harvard University Press book, Afghanistan Rising: Islamic Law and Statecraft between the Ottoman and British Empires. *** The Hamako Ito Chaplin Memorial Award will again be conferred in 2019, administered through the Association for Asian Studies. In accordance with the wishes of the Chaplin family, each year a prize of $1000 will be awarded to either a current graduate student or a full-time instructor of Japanese for excellence in Japanese language teaching at the college level. A full-time instructor who has completed graduate study within the last 3 years in an area that directly involves Japanese language teaching i ...

Read the rest of entry »

Q&A with James L. Huffman, Author of “Down and Out in Late Meiji Japan”

James L. Huffman is Professor Emeritus of Japanese history at Wittenberg University and the 2017 recipient of the AAS Distinguished Contributions to Asian Studies award. A journalist-turned-scholar, Huffman is author of several studies of the history of journalism in Japan, as well as Japan in World History (Oxford University Press, 2010), Modern Japan: A History in Documents (Oxford University Press, second edition 2010), and Japan and Imperialism: 1853–1945 (AAS “Key Issues in Asian Studies” series, second edition 2017). Huffman’s latest book, Down and Out in Late Meiji Japan, was published earlier this year by University of Hawai’i Press. In this wide-ranging work, Huffman examines the lived experiences of the hinmin (urban poor) during the last decades of the Meiji Era (1868–1912), a time when Japan saw enormous growth in both wealth and poverty as the country industrialized. Near the end of the 19th century, hundreds of thousands of rural residents fled rising taxes ...

Read the rest of entry »

About #AsiaNow

#AsiaNow is the blog of the Association for Asian Studies. Views expressed at #AsiaNow are solely those of individual authors and do not represent the opinions of the AAS, its officers, or members.

#AsiaNow Editors

Instructions for Contributors

Submit Your Profile to Member Spotlight

Submit AAS Member News to #AsiaNow

December, 2018 (1)

November, 2018 (3)

October, 2018 (6)

September, 2018 (6)

August, 2018 (3)

July, 2018 (4)

June, 2018 (7)

May, 2018 (5)

April, 2018 (6)

March, 2018 (13)

February, 2018 (10)

January, 2018 (4)

December, 2017 (3)

November, 2017 (12)

October, 2017 (7)

September, 2017 (6)

August, 2017 (11)

July, 2017 (6)

June, 2017 (14)

May, 2017 (6)

April, 2017 (6)

March, 2017 (15)


 
Association for Asian Studies, Inc.
825 Victors Way, Suite 310
Ann Arbor MI, 48108 USA
Phone: 734-665-2490
Fax: 734-665-3801
© Association for Asian Studies | Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use