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January 2019 AAS Member News & Notes

The Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei Studies Group (MSB), a sub-committee of the Southeast Asia Council of the AAS, invites interested attendees at AAS 2019 to come to its annual business meeting, Saturday, March 23, 1:15 to 2:45pm in Plaza Court 4, Sheraton Denver Downtown.  MSB is a vibrant and growing group of cross-disciplinary scholars from North America and beyond with research interests in Malaysia, Singapore, and Brunei. At AAS 2019, Malaysia will be represented more than ever before, with several sponsored panels that focus on the vast political and financial shifts which have occurred in the past year, and on key developments in East Malaysia. The annual business meeting is a key event for networking and learning about opportunities and research in the MSB region. MSB will also be discussing plans for AAS 2020, which include sponsoring “REVISIONING 2020,” panels and roundtables that revisit Prime Minister Mahathir's “Vision 2020” and the Malaysia that emerged since ...

Now Available: Winter 2018 Issue of Education About Asia

Editor’s Message by Lucien Ellington I hope everyone enjoyed a peaceful and joyous holiday season. “What Should We Know About Asia?” is particularly meaningful for two reasons. The special section topic, while always an appropriate question, has never been the specific focus of an EAA special section, and, even though unplanned when the decision was made to address this particular theme, the winter 2018 special section title was the perfect place to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia (NCTA). For those not familiar with NCTA it is the most effective, long-term US collaborative effort to improve elementary and secondary school teacher and student knowledge of East Asia ever created. Anyone who teaches Asia should immensely benefit from reading the contributions of outstanding professors and teachers who’ve been involved in NCTA programs. All NCTA-related contributors deserve accolades. However, without the efforts of Lynn Parisi, ...

December 2018 AAS Member News & Notes

Congratulations to the eight AAS Members who have received grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support their research: Aynne Kokas (University of Virginia), “Border Patrol on the Digital Frontier: China, the United States, and the Global War over Data” Tara Rodman (University of California, Irvine), “Transnationalism, Modernism, and the Orient in the Career of Japanese Dancer and Choreographer Ito Michio (1893–1961)” Eric Schluessel (University of Montana), “An Edition and Translation of Tarikh-i Hamidi, a Nineteenth-century Uyghur History of Eurasia” Satoko Shimazaki (University of Southern California), “Kabuki Actors, Print Technology, and the Theatrical Origins of Modern Media” Amy Stanley (Northwestern University), “Stranger in the Shogun’s City: A Japanese Woman and Her Worlds, 1800–1853” Jun Uchida (Stanford University), “Provincial Merchants and Japanese Imperial Expansion” ...

Change of Plans: Conducting Research in Xinjiang

By Elise Anderson In April 2018, the China and Inner Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies awarded me a Small Grant to travel to Ürümchi (Urumqi, Wulumuqi), Xinjiang, China, to conduct a two-week feasibility study on the topic of “Gender and Music in Uyghur Society.” I planned to draw on my extensive connections in the region to conduct preliminary interviews and participant-observation, as well as to collect written and audio/visual resources, all with the goal of eliciting themes related to how gendered social expectations impact music-making and other forms of cultural production for members of the Uyghur minority. I envisioned this trip as marking the start of my first post-Ph.D. project. A slogan painted on a wall in a Turpan neighborhood, which reads in Uyghur: “Loving the homeland and Xinjiang; unity—making contributions; working hard; helping one another; opening up; progressing.” This and all other photos by the author, June 2018 My interest a ...

First China Made Workshop: Conceiving Infrastructure in a Chinese Register

By Alessandro Rippa In 2015, a mind-blowing statistic made the rounds of all major news outlets: China used more cement between 2011 and 2013 than the United States had in the entire 20th century. While astounding, the news was hardly surprising. During the previous two decades China watchers and the general public alike had become accustomed to the country’s flamboyant infrastructure projects. The Three Gorges Dam, Beijing’s Olympic stadium, the world’s longest high-speed railway network, the longest sea crossing … the list goes on. As Jonathan Bach puts it: “In our present era, China stands out as the paradigmatic infrastructural state: a state produced by and through infrastructure as a modern project.” At the same time, in academia, recent years have seen a proliferation of social science studies of infrastructure. “Infrastructure” became a recurrent theme of debates at disciplinary conferences and workshops, leading to some scholars wondering whe ...

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