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Figuring Korean Futures: Children’s Literature in Modern Korea

By Dafna Zur Dafna Zur is Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages & Cultures at Stanford University and author of Figuring Korean Futures: Children’s Literature in Modern Korea, just published by Stanford University Press. In the fall of 2011 I was a recent graduate of the University of British Columbia and had taken a position at Keimyung University in the Department of Korean Literature. Besides my teaching job, which gave me an opportunity to experience life in Korean academia, I found myself in the rather unenviable position of hakpumo, the parent of a school-age child. My older son was then seven and enrolled in the second semester of first grade. He was thrown into the proverbial “deep end” of elementary school, in which no accommodations were made for speakers of Korean as a second language. I watched him struggle to keep up with sentence dictations and word problems in math, when one of his homework materials caught my eye. It consisted of a short poem, followed by multiple ...

October 2017 AAS Member News & Notes

Many thanks to the members of the AAS 2018 conference program committee, who met in Ann Arbor on September 23, 2017. Committee members reviewed nearly 1,000 organized panel and individual paper submissions in preparation for the meeting, and the AAS appreciates their willingness to devote time and effort to this work. *** The selection committee for the Hamako Ito Chaplin Memorial Award for Excellence in Japanese Language Teaching is now accepting nominations and self-nominations for the 2018 award. The Chaplin Award recognizes outstanding work in the fields of Japanese language pedagogy, linguistics, anthropology, or literature. If you are interested in nominating yourself or a colleague, please complete an application form and submit it to the selection committee chair no later than February 2, 2018. *** The Mid-Atlantic Region Association for Asian Studies (MARAAS) conference will be held October 6-8 at Drexel University in Philadelphia and will feature a keynote address by AAS Past President Laurel ...

Okinoshima, Japan’s Newly Minted UNESCO World Heritage Site

By Lindsey E. DeWitt On July 9, 2017, Japan received its twenty-first UNESCO World Heritage inscription, making a total of seventeen cultural sites and four natural sites (the full list can be accessed here). The newly designated UNESCO World Heritage site, “Sacred Island of Okinoshima and Associated Sites in the Munakata Region,” features a solitary islet just four kilometers in circumference in the middle of the Genkai Sea, some sixty kilometers from the northern part of Kyushu Island. The decision marks the culmination of a nearly decade-long effort and puts a spotlight on the rich religious and cultural landscapes of Kyushu and the broader maritime sphere of the Korean peninsula and the continent. The island’s tiny size and remote location belies its great cultural and historical significance. Japan’s eighth-century chronicles Nihon shoki and Kojiki note Okinoshima as the abode of one of three female deities who descend from the sun goddess Amaterasu (the central deity of Jap ...

September 2017 AAS Member News & Notes

Congratulations to the AAS Members who have received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support research and teaching projects. Evan Dawley (Goucher College) and Tosh Minohara (Kobe University) have received a collaborative research grant to hold a symposium entitled “Beyond Versailles: Reverberations of World War I in Asia.” Richard Davis (Bard College) will organize a three-week seminar for college and university faculty on “The Bhagavad Gita: Ancient Poem, Modern Readers.” *** The Southeast Asian Studies Summer Institute (SEASSI) is pleased to announce that the Usha Mahajani Memorial Prize for 2017 has been awarded to Annika Yates. The Prize is a memorial to Professor Usha Mahajani, whose scholarship on Southeast Asia was brought to an abrupt end by her tragic death in 1978. Professor Mahajani, a native of India, received her PhD in International Relations from the Johns Hopkins University. She was the author of Nationalism in the Philippines and The Role ...

List of JAS Articles Identified for Blocking—But Not Blocked—in China

On August 18, 2017, the Association for Asian Studies (AAS) was informed that Chinese authorities had requested Cambridge University Press (CUP) remove 94 Journal of Asian Studies (JAS) articles and book reviews from its website in the People’s Republic of China.* The AAS and CUP refused that request, and no JAS articles or book reviews have been blocked in China. In the interest of transparency, below is a PDF of the complete list that AAS received from CUP of the “sensitive” JAS pieces as identified by Chinese authorities and organized chronologically (oldest to newest).  List of JAS articles identified for blocking in China (PDF) Although we have removed author names, the AAS has made every effort to contact the authors of these works and inform them of their presence on this list. If any authors of the articles or book reviews listed here have questions or concerns, we ask them to contact AAS Digital Media Manager Maura Cunningham at mcunningham@asian-studies.org for as ...

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