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AAS Co-Signs Statement Opposing U.S. Proposal to Tax Tuition Waivers

The Association for Asian Studies has joined 33 other scholarly organizations within the American Council for Learned Societies in co-signing a statement drafted by the American Philosophical Association opposing a proposal to treat graduate student tuition waivers as taxable income. This proposal was included in the tax reform bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives on November 16, 2017 but does not appear in the version of the bill currently under consideration by the U.S. Senate. We encourage all AAS members to contact their Senators and Representatives and express to them that maintaining tax-free tuition waivers is a necessity for ensuring that American universities remain among the world’s leaders in graduate education. The statement reads as follows: We, the undersigned organizations, stand together in opposition to the proposal to tax graduate school tuition waivers as income, a provision included in the tax reform bill recently passed by the US House of Representatives. As reporte ...

Best of the EAA Archives: November 28, 2017 Edition

The “Best of EAA Articles” are a series of posts that include outstanding articles, essays, interviews, and reviews that are among the over 1,500 archived open access materials available on the Education About Asia website. Titles, short annotations, and links are below. • “Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada: Digital Teaching Resources”(fall 2017) High school and undergraduate survey-level instructors who access the fall 2017 EAA online supplements will find two excellent educational modules (China’s One-Child Policy, The Rise and Fall of the Khmer Rouge Regime) and learn about a prominent not-for-profit organization that focuses upon Canada’s relations with Asia. • “More Than a Meal: School Lunch in Japan” (spring 2017) Alexis Sanborn in this engaging article lucidly depicts how Japanese schools use school lunches as highly effective pedagogical tools. • “Who Did What in a Chinese Lady’s Autobiography? A Text and Lesson Plan on ...

#AsiaNow Speaks with Foong Ping

FOONG Ping is Foster Foundation Curator of Chinese Art at Seattle Art Museum and author of The Efficacious Landscape: On the Authorities of Painting at the Northern Song Court, published by Harvard University Asia Center and winner of the 2017 AAS Joseph Levenson Book Prize, Pre-1900 Category. To begin with, please tell us what your book is about. The book is about ink landscape painting, one of the most distinctive features of Northern Song dynasty culture. It addresses how these works fulfilled diverse functions at court during the late 11th century—as forms of decoration, as a medium of social exchange, and even as an integral element of this pivotal period’s political history. Through landscape’s unique ability to communicate through embodiment, they became potent symbols of imperial authority, and later became objects through which exiled scholars expressed disaffection and dissent. The first part of my study focuses attention on how and why the Song imperial establishment—emper ...

#AsiaNow Speaks with Janet Gyatso

Janet Gyatso is Hershey Professor of Buddhist Studies and Associate Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs at Harvard Divinity School, and author of Being Human in a Buddhist World: An Intellectual History of Medicine in Early Modern Tibet, published by Columbia University Press and winner of the 2017 AAS E. Gene Smith Award for Best Book in Inner Asia. To begin with, please tell us what your book is about. The book is about the history of science and its interactions—and tensions with—religion in the context of early modern Tibet (1300-1800). It studies the intellectual history of medical thought in Tibet, and contrasts it with Buddhist thought in the same time and period. It is also interested in the ways in which medical knowledge borrowed from Buddhist practices and values, while still maintaining a certain distance from religious world views. It uncovers deeply humanistic values and practices that were developed in medical circles in Tibet. And it also questions assumptions that empiricism a ...

Best of the EAA Archives: November 10, 2017 Edition

The “Best of EAA Articles” are a series of posts that include outstanding articles, essays, interviews, and reviews that are among the over 1,500 archived open access materials available on the Education About Asia website. The following articles are a sample of what appears in our latest fall 2017 issue (vol. 22, no. 2) with the special section “Water and Asia.” Titles, short annotations, and links are below. • In “China’s Water Challenges: National and Global Implications,” David Pietz offers compelling examples of the potential worldwide effects of China’s water crisis. • Judith Shapiro’s amply illustrated “China: Harnessing the Waters” provides historical context for China’s current water situation and chronicles the activities of individuals and organized groups to improve water quality in China. • Robert Ivermee does a nice job in “The Hooghly River: A Sacred and Secular Waterway” of combining the met ...

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