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Introducing the Spring 2018 Issue of Education About Asia, “Asian Politics”

Below is the Editor’s Message from the newest issue of Education About Asia, the open-access teaching journal of the Association for Asian Studies. For complete online access to this issue, as well as over 1,500 articles from 22 years of Education About Asia, please visit the EAA website. By Lucien Ellington, Education About Asia Editor I hope readers are enjoying the spring. The intent to make a more effective special section through utilizing a “political economy” approach should be evident in the topical breadth of the issue and, hopefully, a “real world” approach to understanding the influences of demography, geopolitics, national security, technology, economic development, religion, and ethnicity upon governments and politics. The special section, “Asian Politics,” begins with Tony Tai-Ting Liu’s “The Rise of China and its Geopolitical Implications” that should serve as a basic introduction for educators and students to a number of issu ...

AAS Statement on 2018 AAS-in-Asia Conference

A Statement by the Officers of the Association for Asian Studies A controversy is developing among the AAS membership with regard to the AAS-in-Asia conference in Delhi, following the decision of the Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) of the Government of India to deny visas to all Pakistani scholars. The AAS-in-Asia conferences began as an experiment four years ago. Two questions now face our membership: 1) Should the experiment to hold AAS-in-Asia conferences be terminated? and 2) How should AAS handle the current situation? With regard to the first question, AAS members need to consider two sets of difficulties that arise in holding AAS conferences in Asia. The first is finding host institutions that are willing to provide the faculty, administrative staffing, and funding involved in organizing a conference that is now being attended by some 1,000 scholars. This is a challenge everywhere: even the smaller regional conferences affiliated with AAS stateside are finding it difficult in this age of b ...

Statement on Denial of Visas to Scholars from Pakistan for the 2018 AAS-in-Asia Conference

A joint statement from the Association for Asian Studies and Ashoka University: The first AAS-in-Asia conference was held at the National University of Singapore in 2014, and in subsequent years there have been conferences at the Academia Sinica in Taipei, at Doshisha University in Kyoto, and at Korea University in Seoul. The purpose of the AAS-in-Asia conferences is to encourage collaboration and intellectual exchange among scholars based in various parts of Asia and between scholars based in Asia and those based in other parts of the world. The fact that the Ministry of External Affairs of the Government of India has decided to deny visas to Pakistani scholars (including scholars of Pakistani origin who are citizens of other countries) to attend the AAS-in-Asia conference in Delhi is not in tune with the open exchange of ideas and knowledge that is the very purpose of the conference. However, neither the Association for Asian Studies nor Ashoka University has the authority to tell the Government of India ...

June 2018 AAS Member News & Notes

Congratulations to the AAS Members awarded grants by the Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Program in China Studies! Predissertation-Summer Travel Grants Yifeng Cai (Brown University), “Transactional Sex on the Phone: Technology, Market Economy, and the Transformation of Male-to-Male Intimacy in Contemporary Urban China” Xiaobai Hu (University of Pennsylvania), “Unruly Mountain: Transformative Encounters in the Chinese-Tibetan Borderland, 1371-1701” Xiaoqian Ji (Johns Hopkins University), “Cosmetic Practices in Early Modern China: Consumption, Vernacular Knowledge, and Technologies of Gender” Jingyu Liu (Harvard University), “The Unimpeded Passage: The Buddho-Daoist Interaction and The Making of Salvation Rites in the Song Dynasty (960-1279)” Fusheng Luo (University of Michigan), “Debating Property Rights: Land Market, Semi-Colonial Law, and Chinese Industrialization in Shanghai and Guangzhou, 1830-1950” Tan Zhao (University of Washingt ...

After 50 Years, “Marketing and Social Structure in Rural China” Remains a China Studies Classic

By Daniel Knorr G. William Skinner (1925-2008) was an anthropologist of China who taught at Cornell, Columbia, Stanford, and the University of California, Davis during his long and impressive career. President of the AAS in 1983, among Skinner’s many contributions to the field is a trio of articles that appeared in the Journal of Asian Studies in 1964-65, in which he set out his analysis of the social and economic networks connecting marketing towns in rural China. Skinner’s insights attracted such attention among China specialists that in 1974 the AAS published his JAS articles in a single volume, Marketing and Social Structure in Rural China. The book proved so popular that the association reprinted it five times over the next three decades. As Daniel Knorr explains in the short essay below, Skinner’s work remains one of the foundational texts for China studies and should be read (and re-read) by all scholars in the field. We are currently offering copies of the sixth reprint of Mark ...

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