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AAS 2018 Book Prize Winners

The AAS is pleased to announce the winners of this year’s book prize competitions and offer congratulations to the authors and presses. We encourage everyone to attend the Awards Ceremony at the upcoming AAS annual conference in Washington, D.C. on Friday, March 23, where the authors will be recognized and receive citations. Joseph Levenson Pre-1900 Book Prize (China) Li Chen, Chinese Law in Imperial Eyes: Sovereignty, Justice, and Transcultural Politics, Columbia University Press Joseph Levenson Post-1900 Book Prize (China) Sigrid Schmalzer, Red Revolution, Green Revolution: Scientific Farming in Socialist China, University of Chicago Press E. Gene Smith Book Prize (Inner Asia) Tom Cliff, Oil and Water: Being Han in Xinjiang, University of Chicago Press Honorable Mention: Daniel Hirshberg, Remembering the Lotus-Born: Padmasambhava in the History of Tibet’s Golden Age, Wisdom Publications Patrick D. Hanan Book Prize for Translation (China and Inner Asia) Stephen Durrant, Wai-yee Li, Dav ...

January 2018 AAS Member News & Notes

Congratulations to AAS Member Haun Saussy, University Professor of the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of Chicago, who has been awarded the 2018 Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for Comparative Literary Studies by the Modern Language Association of America. Dr. Saussy received the honor for his recent book, The Ethnography of Rhythm: Orality and Its Technologies (Fordham University Press, 2016). *** We are pleased to share the news that the seven AAS Members below have received grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities in support of their work: Ana Candela (SUNY Research Foundation, Binghamton), “A History of Chinese Settlers in Peru in the 19th and 20th Centuries” Sakura Christmas (Bowdoin College), “Nomadic Borderlands: Imperial Japan and the Origins of Ethnic Autonomy in Modern China” Sumit Guha (University of Texas, Austin), “The Political Ecology of Agrarian Empires in South Asia, c.1500–1900” Marta Hanson (Johns Hopkins Un ...

Best of the EAA Archives: Using Literature in the Classroom Edition

The “Best of EAA Articles” are a series of posts that include outstanding articles, essays, interviews, and reviews that are among the over 1,500 archived open access materials available on the Education About Asia website. Titles, short annotations, and links are below. Throughout the years, a number of superb literature articles, essays, and interviews have been published in EAA. This is the first installment of several we plan to post in the coming weeks. • “History As Literature, Literature As History, Lost Names: Scenes From a Korean Boyhood — An EAA Interview with Richard Kim” (fall 1999): Richard Kim describes his novel about a young boy in Japanese-occupied Korea: “…all the characters and events in the book are real but everything else is fiction.” Middle school, high school, and undergraduate instructors have all assigned this superb work. • “Her: An Indonesian Short Story” by Titis Basino, translated by Florence Lamoureux (sp ...

Best of the EAA Archives: Maritime History Edition

Maritime History is a field of study that often is not integrated into high school or beginning undergraduate survey courses. The articles and essay below, from our fall 2014 special section “Maritime Asia,” provide readers with a variety of choices that are applicable to world history, geography, and anthropology courses. The “Best of EAA Articles” are a series of posts that include outstanding articles, essays, interviews, and reviews that are among the over 1,500 archived open-access materials available on the Education About Asia website. Titles, short annotations, and links are below. • “When the World Came to Southeast Asia: Malacca and the Global Economy” Historian and Southeast Asia specialist Michael Vann uses a once-great port city in assisting readers to understand that Southeast Asia has played an important role for a long time in the global economy. • “Maritime Southeast Asia: Not Just a Crossroads” Historian and anthropologist Jennife ...

December 2017 AAS Member News & Notes

Congratulations to former AAS President Theodore Bestor, Reischauer Institute Professor of Social Anthropology and Director of the Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard University, who was recently awarded the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon, by the Japanese government. Bestor received the commendation for his “extensive contributions to the study of Japan and to the promotion of scholarly and educational exchange between Japan and the United States of America throughout his career.” In a note of thanks to his colleagues, Bestor writes: I have to remind friends (and myself) that whatever I have done—researched, taught, written about Japan as an anthropologist—has only been possible because of the kindness and patience of countless Japanese who have been willing to talk with an inquisitive stranger and to allow me to learn about their lives and communities (not to mention their food)!  I am grateful to the Japanese government for thi ...

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