>
AsiaNow banner

From category archives: #AsiaNow

February 2019 AAS Member News & Notes

Congratulations to AAS Member Nancy S. Steinhardt (University of Pennsylvania), who has been honored by the College Art Association with its Distinguished Teaching of Art History Award. *** AAS Member Kenneth Pomeranz (University of Chicago) is co-winner of the prestigious Dan David Prize in the “Past” category for his work on the macro history of East Asia. *** Longtime AAS Member Chi Wang has been recognized by Senator James Risch, Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, for his 47 years of service at the Library of Congress. Dr. Wang was head of the library’s Chinese and Korea Section from 1975 until his retirement in 2004. Read the full text of Senator Risch’s remarks honoring Dr. Wang in the Congressional Record. *** THANK YOU to all who donated to the AAS in 2018; the list of donors is now posted online. Your support enables us to carry out many important programs and initiatives, and we greatly appreciate all donations we receive. To support the ...

Read the rest of entry »

Meet the New VP: Christine Reiko Yano

Christine Reiko Yano is professor of anthropology at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. She will take office as the AAS vice president following the March 21-24 conference in Denver, Colorado. I am an anthropologist of Japan with research on popular culture analyzed through multiple lenses of gender, affect, nationalism, globalism, and consumption. I come to the AAS vice presidency as an outlier—Asian American (Sansei, third-generation Japanese American, born and raised in Hawai’i), working-class background, popular culture research. But it is these very outlier positions that provide a perspective that may be of benefit to the field of Asian Studies. I have been active within AAS, serving on the Northeast Asia Council (including as Chair) and the Distinguished Speakers Bureau. I currently serve on the American Advisory Committee of Japan Foundation (AAC, elected chair as of 2018). At the same time, I have recently been active in the field of Asian American Studies, serving since 2017 on ...

Read the rest of entry »

AAS 2019 Book Prizes

The AAS is pleased to announce the winners of this year’s book prize competitions and offer congratulations to the authors and presses. We encourage everyone to attend the Awards Ceremony at the upcoming AAS annual conference in Denver, CO on Friday, March 22, where the authors will be recognized and receive citations. Joseph Levenson Pre-1900 Book Prize (China) Jonathan Schlesinger, A World Trimmed with Fur: Wild Things, Pristine Places, and the Natural Fringes of Qing Rule, Stanford University Press Honorable Mention: Craig Clunas, Chinese Painting and Its Audiences, Princeton University Press Joseph Levenson Post-1900 Book Prize (China) Ching Kwan Lee, The Specter of Global China: Politics, Labor, and Foreign Investment in Africa, University of Chicago Press Honorable Mention: Thomas Mullaney, The Chinese Typewriter: A History, MIT Press John Whitney Hall Book Prize (Japan) Bryan D. Lowe, Ritualized Writing: Buddhist Practice and Scriptural Cultures in Ancient Japan, Unive ...

Read the rest of entry »

January 2019 AAS Member News & Notes

The Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei Studies Group (MSB), a sub-committee of the Southeast Asia Council of the AAS, invites interested attendees at AAS 2019 to come to its annual business meeting, Saturday, March 23, 1:15 to 2:45pm in Plaza Court 4, Sheraton Denver Downtown.  MSB is a vibrant and growing group of cross-disciplinary scholars from North America and beyond with research interests in Malaysia, Singapore, and Brunei. At AAS 2019, Malaysia will be represented more than ever before, with several sponsored panels that focus on the vast political and financial shifts which have occurred in the past year, and on key developments in East Malaysia. The annual business meeting is a key event for networking and learning about opportunities and research in the MSB region. MSB will also be discussing plans for AAS 2020, which include sponsoring “REVISIONING 2020,” panels and roundtables that revisit Prime Minister Mahathir's “Vision 2020” and the Malaysia that emerged since ...

Read the rest of entry »

December 2018 AAS Member News & Notes

Congratulations to the eight AAS Members who have received grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities to support their research: Aynne Kokas (University of Virginia), “Border Patrol on the Digital Frontier: China, the United States, and the Global War over Data” Tara Rodman (University of California, Irvine), “Transnationalism, Modernism, and the Orient in the Career of Japanese Dancer and Choreographer Ito Michio (1893–1961)” Eric Schluessel (University of Montana), “An Edition and Translation of Tarikh-i Hamidi, a Nineteenth-century Uyghur History of Eurasia” Satoko Shimazaki (University of Southern California), “Kabuki Actors, Print Technology, and the Theatrical Origins of Modern Media” Amy Stanley (Northwestern University), “Stranger in the Shogun’s City: A Japanese Woman and Her Worlds, 1800–1853” Jun Uchida (Stanford University), “Provincial Merchants and Japanese Imperial Expansion” ...

Read the rest of entry »

AAS 2018 Election Results

The fall 2018 AAS elections have concluded, and we are pleased to provide the results in each category. Although the national mid-term elections no doubt occupied most members’ attentions, the fall AAS election also has concluded, and we are happy to provide the results in each category. A total of 1,959 votes were cast, representing about 29% of the membership, slightly down from last year’s record 32% participation. Newly elected representatives will take office immediately after the upcoming annual conference in Denver next March.  We congratulate the winners and thank all candidates for their willingness to serve the association. We also thank all members who participated in the electoral process, both national and organizational, especially in a political climate that is so polarized and dysfunctional. President Current Vice President Prasenjit Duara (Duke University) will move into the presidency. Vice President Christine Yano (University of ...

Read the rest of entry »

November 2018 AAS Member News & Notes

Congratulations to the two AAS Members recognized by the American Historical Association with book prizes for their work. Tom Mullaney (Stanford University) has received the John K. Fairbank Prize for East Asian history since 1800 for The Chinese Typewriter: A History (MIT Press). Faiz Ahmed (Brown University) has been awarded the John F. Richards Prize for South Asian history for his Harvard University Press book, Afghanistan Rising: Islamic Law and Statecraft between the Ottoman and British Empires. *** The Hamako Ito Chaplin Memorial Award will again be conferred in 2019, administered through the Association for Asian Studies. In accordance with the wishes of the Chaplin family, each year a prize of $1000 will be awarded to either a current graduate student or a full-time instructor of Japanese for excellence in Japanese language teaching at the college level. A full-time instructor who has completed graduate study within the last 3 years in an area that directly involves Japanese language teaching i ...

Read the rest of entry »

AAS Names Next Executive Director

The Board of Directors of the Association for Asian Studies is pleased to announce that it has appointed Dr. Hilary Vanessa Finchum-Sung as the association’s next Executive Director. Dr. Finchum-Sung will join the AAS on March 1, 2019 and will officially take office on April 1, 2019, following current Executive Director Michael Paschal’s retirement. Hilary Finchum-Sung (Ph.D., Indiana University) is a specialist in Korean music theory and performance practice and has been a member of the AAS for almost twenty years. Her academic training is in both ethnomusicology and East Asian Studies. Finchum-Sung has spent the past decade in the Republic of Korea, where she made history as the first and (to date) only non-Korean to have served as a faculty member in a department of Korean Music. She has published in academic journals such as Ethnomusicology, the world of music (new series), Seoul Journal of Korean Studies, and Acta Koreana. As Associate Professor of Korean Music Theory and Ethnomusi ...

Read the rest of entry »

October 2018 AAS Member News & Notes

The Southeast Asian Studies Summer Institute (SEASSI) is pleased to announce that the Usha Mahajani Memorial Prize for 2018 has been awarded to Phianphachong Intarat (University of Hawai’i at Manoa). The prize is a memorial to Professor Usha Mahajani, whose scholarship on Southeast Asia was brought to an abrupt end by her tragic death in 1978. Professor Mahajani, a native of India, received her Ph.D. in International Relations from the Johns Hopkins University. She was the author of Nationalism in the Philippines and The Role of Indian Minorities in Burma and Malaysia and numerous articles on Southeast Asian politics and international relations. At the time of her death she was professor of political science at Central Washington State University. The prize was established by a gift from her husband to the Association for Asian Studies, and SEASSI administers the competition for the prize on behalf of the Southeast Asia Council of AAS. Phianphachong Intarat, the 2018 recipient of the Usha Mahajani Pr ...

Read the rest of entry »

“My Paper Was Turned Down. Should I Take It Personally?”

This is a revised and updated version of Laurel Kendall’s President’s Column from the Fall 2016 issue of the AAS E-Newsletter. The carefully crafted panel submission, a summation of hot-breaking research, the anticipation of a lively intellectual exchange … and then the rejection message, “owing to the number of high-quality submissions and the limitations of space”—a splash of cold water! Many of us have been there—I certainly have—and so have many distinguished scholars, including at least one former President of the AAS whose proposed submissions were rejected twice in the years after his service. It happens. In such circumstances it is difficult not to feel that “there must have been some mistake,” or worse “AAS is just not interested in the kind of work I do,” or still worse, that “someone on the program committee had it in for me.” In a healthy organization, there will always be many more proposals than available slo ...

Read the rest of entry »

Pages: Previous12345NextReturn Top

About #AsiaNow

#AsiaNow is the blog of the Association for Asian Studies. Views expressed at #AsiaNow are solely those of individual authors and do not represent the opinions of the AAS, its officers, or members.

#AsiaNow Editors

Instructions for Contributors

Submit Your Profile to Member Spotlight

Submit AAS Member News to #AsiaNow

March, 2019 (4)

February, 2019 (7)

January, 2019 (4)

December, 2018 (2)

November, 2018 (3)

October, 2018 (6)

September, 2018 (6)

August, 2018 (3)

July, 2018 (4)

June, 2018 (7)

May, 2018 (5)

April, 2018 (6)

March, 2018 (13)

February, 2018 (10)

January, 2018 (4)

December, 2017 (3)

November, 2017 (12)

October, 2017 (7)

September, 2017 (6)

August, 2017 (11)

July, 2017 (6)

June, 2017 (14)

May, 2017 (6)

April, 2017 (6)

March, 2017 (15)


 
Association for Asian Studies, Inc.
825 Victors Way, Suite 310
Ann Arbor MI, 48108 USA
Phone: 734-665-2490
Fax: 734-665-3801
© Association for Asian Studies | Privacy Statement | Terms Of Use