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From the monthly archives: March, 2017

We are pleased to present below all posts archived in 'March, 2017'. If you still can't find what you are looking for, try using the search box.

The Tangible and Intangible Benefits of Membership

—and the Importance of YOUR Membership in AAS to You and to the Field of Asian Studies The following post is a revised version of AAS Executive Director Michael Paschal’s column from the December 2016 issue of the Asian Studies E-Newsletter.   Traditionally the benefits of membership in the Association for Asian Studies could be measured in tangible terms, whether discount member rates for conference registration and other association products or in the number of print publications received. The latter have included at various times over the years the print Journal of Asian Studies (JAS), the Newsletter, Education About Asia, the annual conference program, and the AAS member directory. With the onset of the digital age however, many of these publications are now available to members through institutional subscriptions or via the AAS website. Some members might view the traditional print versions of the above as somewhat of a dubious benefit or even a liability when trying to find shel ...

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#AsiaNow Speaks with Anna M. Shields

Anna M. Shields is Professor of East Asian Studies at Princeton University and the author of One Who Knows Me: Friendship and Literary Culture in Mid-Tang China, published by Harvard Asia Center (2015) and winner of the 2017 AAS Honorable Mention for the Levenson Book Prize (pre-1900).   To begin with, please tell us what your book is about. My book explores mid-Tang [Dynasty] literature in order to understand the complex value mid-Tang writers discovered in friendship―as a rewarding social practice, a rich literary topic, a way to negotiate literati identity, and a path toward self-understanding. I look at the evolution of the performance of friendship in a wide range of genres, including letters, prefaces, exchange poetry, and funerary texts, and I translate and explicate dozens of texts. The book follows the life-course of mid-Tang literati men, from youthful competition in the exams through career vicissitudes to death and commemoration.   What inspired you to research this topic? I was ...

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New Titles from “Key Issues in Asian Studies”

In addition to its two periodicals, the Journal of Asian Studies and Education About Asia, the Association for Asian Studies publishes several book series, including “Key Issues in Asian Studies.” Edited by Lucien Ellington (University of Tennessee at Chattanooga), the “Key Issues in Asian Studies” series produces short texts intended for advanced high-school and undergraduate classroom use. We now have two new titles, as well as two revised and updated books, available for purchase:   NEW Chinese Literature: An Introduction, by Ihor Pidhainy In this brief yet thorough introduction to the key features and important names of Chinese literature, Ihor Pidhainy covers Chinese writings from oracle bones to the internet. Contextualizing the literature within political, historical and cultural frames, Prof. Pidhainy also provides a smorgasbord of examples from the authors noted. Written with a college freshman (or senior in high school) in mind, the book combines an introduction t ...

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Wrapping Up AAS 2017

Bob Snow, who will retire in June from his position as the AAS Director of Outreach and Strategic Initiatives, receives a commendation for his ten years of service from AAS President Laurel Kendall at the President’s Reception on Saturday, March 18. As the 2017 annual conference enters its final hours, here are your AAS Sunday highlights: Panel sessions run from 8:30am to 12:45pm. The Exhibit Hall is open between 9:00am and noon—and many publishers will be offering deep last-day discounts on their books!  Graduate students interested in submitting their presented papers to the Area Councils for consideration in the “Best Graduate Student Paper” competitions must do so by the end of the day. See your individual Area Council page on the AAS website for more information. Graduate students eligible for travel stipends who have not yet picked them up should visit the Vide office on the Lower Concourse to do so; stipends are available during registration hours this morning (8:00 ...

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Saturday Happenings at AAS 2017

AAS Executive Director Michael Paschal and the AAS officers at Friday’s Presidential Address and Awards Ceremony. Seated, L-R: Laurel Kendall (President), Tim Brook (Past President), Katherine Bowie (Vice President), and Mrinalini Sinha (Past Past President). Toronto’s weather forecast calls for snow today—AAS snowball fight, anyone?  If there aren’t any takers for that, here are the highlights of today’s conference schedule, all of which are happening inside where it’s warm and dry: Panel sessions and the AAS Film Expo both begin at 8:30am.  The Exhibit Hall will be open from 9:00am through 6:00pm. Between 2:30 and 3:00pm, we’ll have a coffee break in the Vide lobby outside the Exhibit Hall on the Lower Concourse, so grab a cup to sip while you browse the many offerings of our exhibitors. Two editors of AAS publications will be available at the AAS booth (#201) in the Exhibit Hall beginning at 9:00am to meet prospective authors. Those interested i ...

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AAS 2017: Friday Highlights

Dr. Zhang Longxi delivering the opening keynote address for AAS 2017 on Thursday, March 16. Good morning, and welcome to the first full day of AAS 2017 in Toronto! A few of the notable happenings in the hours to come: Our Exhibit Hall will be open on the Lower Concourse level (today’s hours: 8:30am-5:00pm).  Screenings at the AAS Film Expo continue between 8:30am and 8:00pm. Between 8:30 and 9:00am, join us for a coffee break in the Vide lobby on the Lower Concourse level, take a spin through the Exhibit Hall, and then make your way to the Grand Ballroom Centre by 9:00 for the Awards Ceremony and Presidential Address. AAS President Laurel Kendall will give a talk titled “Things Fall Apart: Material Religion and the Problem of Decay with examples from Korea, Vietnam, and Myanmar.” See the list of AAS Book Prize winners here. Panel sessions begin at 10:30am and run until 7:15pm. Special panels on today’s schedule include an Asia Beyond the Headlines discussion on “Parti ...

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Welcome to AAS 2017!

We’re ready to kick off AAS 2017 in Toronto and hope that everyone traveling today has a smooth journey! Have you downloaded the conference app yet? Don’t forget to check out our list of 10 cool features the app offers! Highlights of Thursday’s program: The registration counters will open at 12:00 noon on the Concourse level of the Sheraton. Film Expo screenings begin at 12:30pm in Maple West (Mezzanine Level). Please note that this is a change of location from what is listed in the printed program book. At 6:00pm, Dr. Zhang Longxi of City University of Hong Kong will deliver the keynote address, “Asian Studies, Interdisciplinarity, and Comparative Work,” in the Grand Ballroom on the Lower Concourse. Panels will start at 7:30pm. Tonight’s program includes a special roundtable for graduate students, “Beyond the Academy: Careers for Asianists,” in City Hall (2nd floor). The graduate student reception will run from 9:30 to 11:00pm in Dominion Ballroo ...

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Ten Useful Features in the AAS 2017 Conference App

We first introduced an AAS conference app at the Chicago meeting in 2015 and have been working hard to improve it each year since. Thanks to everyone who has provided feedback on previous versions of the app—hearing from conference attendees is how we learn what about the app is useful and what we can make better in the future.   This year’s app, built using the Guidebook platform, is bursting with features that will enhance your conference experience. We’ve put a huge amount of information—about panels, exhibitors, meetings-in-conjunction, films, the weather, restaurants, and more—in the palm of your hand. The AAS app should be a one-stop-shop for everything you need to know while attending this year’s conference. Are we missing a feature? Let us know and we’ll see if we can add it to the 2018 app.   The AAS app is available in both desktop and mobile versions. While the desktop version has all the important menu items, the mobile app offers a couple of ...

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Animals, Anniversaries, Archives, and Food: A Few AAS 2017 Panels I Wish I Could Catch

The following is a revised and expanded version of an article that first appeared in the December 2016 E-Newsletter.   This is my first year working for the AAS rather than being an attendee at the annual conference. Although there are plenty of good things about my job, the one downside is that I most likely won’t have time to catch many panels. Still, old habits die hard, and as soon as the conference program arrived in my office I sat down and read through it—impressed, as usual, by the breadth and depth of the Asian Studies field.   Panel topics at AAS always cover an enormous range of time periods, geographic places, and academic fields of study. Some topics are perennial ones, discussed anew each decade in light of the latest archival discoveries or turn in scholarly perspective. Others, however, are less common, representing entire new sub-specialties or a periodic focus on events that otherwise do not receive a great deal of attention.   In looking over the panel sessi ...

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Meet the New AAS Vice President

Anne Feldhaus is Distinguished Foundation Professor of Religious Studies at Arizona State University and will become AAS vice president after the 2017 conference in Toronto. In the summer after my first year of college, I had the chance to live in Paris for some months. I returned elated and wiser, and confident that I had already used up my allotted time to spend outside the US. I was wrong. Just two years later, a professor at my college invited me to accompany her to India for the summer. I jumped at the chance. After some delicate negotiations with my parents and the college, I set off across the world—and into the rest of my life. I fell in love with India that first time, a complicated love that has grown even more complex over the years. I have spent much of my adult life figuring out how to get back to India again and again, how to live there for long periods of time, and how to deepen my friendships with and understanding of ever more kinds of people there. Graduate school was at first ...

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