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From the monthly archives: March, 2018

We are pleased to present below all posts archived in 'March, 2018'. If you still can't find what you are looking for, try using the search box.

#AsiaNow Speaks with Daniel A. Hirshberg

Daniel A. Hirshberg is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Mary Washington and author of Remembering the Lotus-Born: Padmasambhava in the History of Tibet’s Golden Age, published by Wisdom Publications and winner of Honorable Mention for the 2018 AAS E. Gene Smith Book Prize. To begin with, please tell us what your book is about. In Remembering the Lotus-Born I rely on an interdisciplinary approach to Buddhism, historiography, and cultural memory theory to explore the construction and evolution of what is arguably Tibet’s most popular narrative, its conversion to Buddhism under the “Lotus-Born” guru, Padmasambhava (eighth century). An historically shady Indian tantrika, he was invited to Tibet during the imperial apogee under Tri Songdetsen (d. ca. 800). Remembering the Lotus-Born focuses on the biographical and historical narratives of Nyangrel Nyima Özer (1124–92), who is renowned as the first of the great Buddhist “treasure revealers.&rd ...

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#AsiaNow Speaks with Satoko Shimazaki

Satoko Shimazaki is Associate Professor of Japanese theater and literature at the University of Southern California and author of Edo Kabuki in Transition: From the Worlds of the Samurai to the Vengeful Female Ghost, published by Columbia University Press and winner of the 2018 AAS John Whitney Hall Book Prize. To begin with, please tell us what your book is about. Edo Kabuki in Transition is a revisionist history of the all-male kabuki theater of Japan. It explores the crucial role kabuki played in early modern times (1600-1868) in building a historically grounded urban community in the young shogunal capital of Edo, specifically by allowing a broad public to participate in and rewrite history centered on the elites. The book also shows how this function begins to wane in the early nineteenth century by exploring the trope of the vengeful female ghost who is bent on getting revenge on the object of a personal grudge—in particular Oiwa in Tsuruya Nanboku’s canonical ghost play Tokaido Yotsuya ka ...

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Learn from My Past Mistakes: Tips for First-Time AAS Attendees

My first time attending an AAS conference was in 2010, when I was a second-year PhD student, and I’ve only missed two since then. Even before I began working for the association, I frequently told people that AAS is my favorite scholarly meeting: it’s my intellectual home and also gives me the chance to catch up with friends whom I might only see once every few years. But much as I enjoy AAS, I’ve also found that it’s easy to burn out before the conference is half over (this is especially true if, like me, you’re an introvert—four days of social interactions can be wearing). There are plenty of guides out there that offer advice on conference networking, presenting, and other professionalization topics, so I won’t duplicate those recommendations here. Instead, I’m sharing a few tips and strategies that I’ve developed over the years to keep my energy levels high throughout the weekend and thus have the best AAS experience possible: 1. Pack lots of snac ...

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March 2018 AAS Member News & Notes

Congratulations to AAS Member Mitra Sharafi (University of Wisconsin-Madison), recipient of a Frederick Burkhardt Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS). Dr. Sharafi will spend the 2020-21 academic year in residence at the National Humanities Center working on her project, “Fear of the False: Forensic Science in Colonial India.” *** The ACLS has also selected AAS Members Levi McLaughlin (North Carolina State University) and Tulasi Srinivas (Emerson College) as two of its Luce/ACLS Fellows in Religion, Journalism & International Affairs. Dr. McLaughlin will use the fellowship to continue his research project on “Religious Influences on Japanese Politics and Policymaking,” and Dr. Srinivas will explore “The Absent Goddess: Religion, Ecology and Violence in Urban India” during her fellowship term. *** The Hamako Ito Chaplin Memorial Award is conferred yearly and administered through the Association for Asian Studies. In accordance with the wi ...

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#AsiaNow Speaks with Sigrid Schmalzer

Sigrid Schmalzer is professor of history at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and author of Red Revolution, Green Revolution: Scientific Farming in Socialist China, published by University of Chicago Press and winner of the 2018 AAS Joseph Levenson Post-1900 Book Prize. To begin with, please tell us what your book is about. Red Revolution, Green Revolution is about what science meant to people in Mao-era China, where official policy called for uniting tu and yang—native, earthy, peasant-based knowledge with Western, elite, professional science. It’s about scientists who mobilized peasants to rear parasitic wasps for the control of insect pests; girls whose efforts to fertilize fields with pig manure challenged gender norms and thus counted as revolutionary “scientific experiment”; local cadres who promoted modern high-yielding varieties of rice while secretly allowing traditional varieties to be planted in hidden valleys; “old peasants” whose resistance was alternat ...

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