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Introducing the Fall 2017 Issue of Education About Asia, “Water and Asia”

Below is the Editor’s Message from the newest issue of Education About Asia, the open-access teaching journal of the Association for Asian Studies. For complete online access to this issue, as well as over 1,500 articles from 22 years of Education About Asia, please visit the EAA website. By Lucien Ellington, Education About Asia Editor We hope readers had an enjoyable summer. This issue of EAA includes the special section “Water and Asia.” Scholars who have published extensively on China environmental issues provide in the first two articles, comprehensive overviews of China’s water problems that complement each other and should be quite useful for the classroom. In “China’s Water Challenges: National and Global Implications,” David Pietz offers compelling examples of the potential worldwide effects of China’s water crisis. Judith Shapiro’s amply illustrated “China: Harnessing the Waters” provides historical context for China’s current ...

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#AsiaNow Speaks with Noriko Manabe

Noriko Manabe is associate professor at Temple University’s Boyer College of Music & Dance and author of The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Protest Music After Fukushima, published by Oxford University Press and winner of the 2017 AAS John Whitney Hall Book Prize. What inspired you to research this topic? In 2011, I returned to Japan to finish my book on Japanese club musics (i.e., hip-hop, reggae, EDM), and I found that many of my contacts, like Rankin Taxi and ECD, had become involved in the post-3.11 antinuclear movement. (Both had recorded antinuclear songs previous to 3.11). I sensed their alarm, not only about the fallout from the nuclear accident itself, but from its implications for media coverage, collusion, freedom of information, and the future of Japanese democracy. Living in Japan on sabbatical in 2012, the urgency of this topic became evident to me. Therefore, I decided to complete a book on this topic first. What obstacles did you face in this project? What turned out better/eas ...

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Best of the EAA Archives: A New #AsiaNow Feature

This is the first of a series of posts that will highlight outstanding articles, essays, interviews, and reviews that are among the over 1,500 archived open access materials available on the Education About Asia website. Titles, short annotations, and links are below. • Nimish Adhia’s “The History of Economic Development in India since Independence” (winter 2015) is a superb, clearly written introductory overview for students on Indian economic history since 1947.  • Marvin Marcus, also the author of the Key Issues in Asia Studies volume Japanese Literature: From Murasaki to Murakami, in "Natsume Sōseki and Modern Japanese Literature” (fall 2015) published an engaging biographical sketch of the iconic Japanese novelist.  • Readers of Wang Ping's autobiographical “I am a Chinese English Teacher” (fall 2015) will learn not only about the life of a Chinese high school teacher, but also get a sense of the changes that occurred in China ov ...

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Figuring Korean Futures: Children’s Literature in Modern Korea

By Dafna Zur Dafna Zur is Assistant Professor of East Asian Languages & Cultures at Stanford University and author of Figuring Korean Futures: Children’s Literature in Modern Korea, just published by Stanford University Press. In the fall of 2011 I was a recent graduate of the University of British Columbia and had taken a position at Keimyung University in the Department of Korean Literature. Besides my teaching job, which gave me an opportunity to experience life in Korean academia, I found myself in the rather unenviable position of hakpumo, the parent of a school-age child. My older son was then seven and enrolled in the second semester of first grade. He was thrown into the proverbial “deep end” of elementary school, in which no accommodations were made for speakers of Korean as a second language. I watched him struggle to keep up with sentence dictations and word problems in math, when one of his homework materials caught my eye. It consisted of a short poem, followed by multiple ...

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October 2017 AAS Member News & Notes

Many thanks to the members of the AAS 2018 conference program committee, who met in Ann Arbor on September 23, 2017. Committee members reviewed nearly 1,000 organized panel and individual paper submissions in preparation for the meeting, and the AAS appreciates their willingness to devote time and effort to this work. *** The selection committee for the Hamako Ito Chaplin Memorial Award for Excellence in Japanese Language Teaching is now accepting nominations and self-nominations for the 2018 award. The Chaplin Award recognizes outstanding work in the fields of Japanese language pedagogy, linguistics, anthropology, or literature. If you are interested in nominating yourself or a colleague, please complete an application form and submit it to the selection committee chair no later than February 2, 2018. *** The Mid-Atlantic Region Association for Asian Studies (MARAAS) conference will be held October 6-8 at Drexel University in Philadelphia and will feature a keynote address by AAS Past President Laurel ...

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